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Museums in Paris

Paris amazes with its unique cultural heritage and typical traditions, which are documented in the numerous museum collections. Each tourist should include important museums, such as the Louvre, in their itinerary. Being the oldest and probably the most famous art museum in the world, the Louvre features the renowned Da Vinci’s masterpiece 'Mona Lisa' and rich historical collections from the times of the great civilisations until present day. Another 'must see' is the Museum d’Orsay with its unique Impressionist collection and splendid royal halls. Some other Paris museums worth a visit are the Museum of Rodin, the Museum of Picasso, Centre Georges Pompidou and Hôtel National des Invalides. The fans of contemporary art collections will enjoy the exhibitions at the National Museum of Modern Art.


Musée du Luxembourg
Musée du Luxembourg, by Fabrice
 
Musée du Luxembourg
Address: 19, rue de Vaugirard
  Phone: +33 1 42 34 25 95
  e-mail: info@museeduluxembourg.fr  
Website: http://www.museeduluxembourg.fr  
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Located next to the Palais du Luxembourg, the former Musée du Luxembourg, which once housed permanent 19th-century sculpture and painting collections, is currently a gallery representing temporary exhibitions, in compliance with a programme decided by the Ministry of Culture and the Senate.
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Musée du Vin
Musée du Vin, by Alex Brie
Musée du Vin
Address: Rue des Eaux - 5 square Dickens
  Phone: +33 1 45 25 63 26
 
Website: http://www.museeduvinparis.com  

Opening Hours: Monday-Sunday 10 -18  
Opened in 1984, the Wine Museum of Paris is a cultural centre aiming to display the full richness and diversity of the French wine-making heritage. Among the exhibits there are tools and memorabilia, which allow visitors to discover the ancient traditions of wine-making and viticulture.
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Musée Dupuytren
Musée Dupuytren, by REdondAL
 
Musée Dupuytren
Address: 15, rue de l'Ecole de Médecine
  Phone: +33 1 43 29 28 60
 
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This museum includes a collection of anatomical pieces illustrating different diseases and malformations. A remainder of the Museum of Pathological Anatomy of the Medicine Faculty, part of the University of Paris, this site was created in 1832 by Orfila out of the legacy of Baron Dupuytren, the famous professor of surgery.
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Musée national d'Art Moderne
Musée national d'Art Moderne, by Elena, Filippo, Sara e Francesca
Musée national d'Art Moderne
Address: Plateau Beaubourg
  Phone: +33 1 44 78 12 33
 
Website: http://www.cnac-gp.fr/  

The Centre national d'art et de culture Georges Pompidou was initiated by President Georges Pompidou who aimed to create an original cultural institution entirely focused on modern and contemporary art, where visual arts would rub shoulders with theatre, music, cinema and literature. Housed in the core of Paris in a structure designed by Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers, the Centre Pompidou first opened in 1977. After renovation work in the period 1997-1999, it reopened in 2000. Since then, it has become one of the most visited attractions in France, with some six million visitors a year, and a total of over 150 million visitors in its 25 years of existence. The Museum of Modern Art, housed in the centre, includes one of Europe's largest collections of modern and contemporary art, a vast public reference library, general documentation on 20th century art, cinema and performance halls, a music research institute, bookshops, a restaurant and a cafe.
Musée Guimet -  National Museum of Asian Arts
Musée Guimet - National Museum of Asian Arts , by jmvnoos
Musée national des Arts Asiatiques - Guimet
Address: 6, place d'Iéna - 19, avenue d'Iéna
  Phone: +33 1 47 23 61 65 -
  e-mail: auditorium@guimet.fr  
Website: http://www.museeguimet.fr  

The Guimet Museum is a site promoting Asian art, and boasting the largest collection of Buddhist art in Europe. One of the twelve major museums in France, the site displays art and archaeology from 17 Asian countries, featuring Afghanistan, Japan, Afghanistan, Cambodia, Tibet. Except for the rare Chinese porcelain, the museum has vast galleries of displays on the Buddhist Pantheon of Japan and China. The museum was first located in Lyon, but, in 1879, it was handed over to the state and transferred to Paris. The Parisian site was founded by Émile Étienne Guimet, an industrialist, in 1885. Devoted to travel, Guimet was commissioned by the minister of public instruction to explore the religions of the Far East. The museum contains many objects assembled during his expedition. Apart from Asian items, the museum has some displays from Ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. From December 2006 to April 2007, the museum holds the collections of the Kabul Museum, with archaeological finds from the Greco-Bactrian city of Ai-Khanoum, plus the Indo-Scythian treasure of Tillia Tepe.
Musée national des Arts d'Afrique et d'Oceanie
Musée national des Arts d'Afrique et d'Oceanie, by Sandra Cohen-Rose and Colin Rose
 
Musée national des Arts d'Afrique et d'Oceanie
Address: 293, avenue Daumesnil
  Phone: +33 1 44 74 84 80
 
Website: http://www.musee-afriqueoceanie.fr  
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Opening Hours: Monday-Friday 10 -17 Saturday-Sunday 10 -18  
Housed in a monument built for the colonial exhibition of 1931, this museum presents collections of African and Oceanic art. The temporary exhibitions include displays on archeology, decorative arts, ethnography, jewellery, painting, furniture, sciences, sculpture and textiles. The musée des Arts d'Afrique et d'Océanie opened in 2004 as the heir of the former Museum of Overseas France. The museum is housed in a building constructed for the 1931 Colonial Exhibition. There are some plans for the Arts d'Afrique et d'Océanie to merge its collections with those of the Musée de l'Homme into a single entity, a Museum of Arts and Civilisations, which will combine art history and ethnology. The site offers teaching activities, guided tours, facilities for the handicapped, a book shop, a gift shop and space hire.
Musée Picasso
Musée Picasso, by Andrew So
 
Musée Picasso
Address: 5, rue de Thorigny
  Phone: +33 1 42 71 25 21
 
Website: http://www.musee-picasso.fr  
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Opening Hours: Monday-Sunday 09 -18  
The Musée Picasso, situated in the core of historic Paris, has a collection of several thousand works of Pablo Picasso. The artist was born in 1881 and began to study art in 1895. During his life he created a striking diversity of works: painting, sculpture, drawing, engraving, ceramics and even poetry. After his death in 1973, the major portion of Picasso's works were presented to the French state, which decided to form a museum for the collection. To house the extensive collection, the state chose to use a 17th-century hotel, located in the Marais. The Hôtel Salé, built in 1656 for general Aubert de Fontenay, was already well-known before housing the Musée Picasso. The site was leased to the ambassador of Venice, and became the Central School of Art and Manufacture, then the School of 'métiers d'art', and was finally leased to the state in 1975. The restoration of the site was completed in 1985. Today, the museum incldues 203 paintings, 191 sculptures, 85 ceramics, and over 3,000 drawings, engravings, and manuscripts. Besides the personal collection of Picasso, the site also has some works of Cézanne and Matisse.
Notre Dame Archaeological Crypt
Notre Dame Archaeological Crypt, by Thomas Shuman
 
Notre Dame de Paris (Crypte archéologique)
Address: Place Jean-Paul II
  Phone: +33 1 43 29 83 51
 
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Notre-Dame de Paris, or simply Notre-Dame, was founded in the 12th Century by Bishop Maurice de Sully, and remains to be the core of Paris, and perhaps of the whole country, as on its front façade marks ‘kilomètre zéro’ on a circular bronze plaque, from where all distances in the city and in France are calculated. The histories of Paris and Notre-Dame intertwine in an inseparable whole. Crusaders prayed here before going off to fight for the Holy Land. Later, the structure was damaged by revolutionaries who destroyed the Galerie des Rois and transformed the building into a secular temple. Then, Napoleon crowned himself emperor here, snatching the crown out of Pope Pius VII’s hands and placing it on his own head before crowning his empress, Joséphine. The site has often been a subject to vandalism and religious wars, which demolished the greater part of the previously existing structure.
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