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Monuments in Italy

Arena Civica
Town: Milan
Address: Viale G. Byron 2
Phone: +39 2 34 1924
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Milan’s premier event venue, Arena Civica, was designed in the neo-Classical style by the architect Luigi Canonica in 1805. It’s situated in the north-eastern corner of the Parco Sempione. It’s location was a deliberate choice – in close proximity to the reconstructed Castello Sforzesco, the Arena Civica was devised as a permanent ground for major festivities and celebrations. The arena was built using materials taken from the ruins of the castle. Modelled after Roman amphitheatres, it features an elliptic floor framed by four main gates.
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Babuino Fontain
Town: Rome
Address: Via del Babuino, 49

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Fontana del Babuino is a small fountain, normally hidden behind the rows of scooters parked around it. Designed and constructed in the times of Pope Gregory XIII, it was officially inaugurated in the last decades of the 16th Century. The asymmetry and controversial proportions of the installation didn’t earn it many admirers; in fact, the ugliness of the statue of the satyr Sileno with his bagpipe earned it the name under which it’s commonly know today, Babuino.


Baths of Caracalla
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Baths of Caracalla, by Richard White
Baths of Caracalla
Town: Rome
Address: Viale Terme di Caracalla, 52
Phone: +39 6 575 8626
e-mail: info@archeorm.arti.beniculturali.it
Website: http://www.archeorm.arti.beniculturali.it/sar2000/caracal
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Completed in the 3rd Century AD under the Emperor Caracalla, the baths remained a fully functional popular spot of recreation for nearly two Centuries, until the Barbarian invasions cut the regular water supply. For hundreds of years, the area was unused, until in 1400 several precious pieces were accidentally discovered turning the entire neighbourhood in a major excavation site. The uncovered treasures can be seen in Palazzo Farnese and the Vatican Museums. Currently, at the site visitors can view remains of the bathing complex and fragments of a temple of Mothra with seats reserved for mystic meals, white-and-black mosaic floor and the hollow for collecting blood from the sacrifices. In August, opera performances are organised in the bath ruins.


Bicocca degli Arcimboldi
Town: Milan
Address: Viale Sarca 202

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Bicocca degli Arcimboldi is a country residence designed by an unknown artist. Constructed in the early 15th Century, it was developed over time; thus, its design is not unitary. The first floor holds an interesting collection of excellent paintings from various epochs. One of the most noteworthy architectonical solutions used in the design are the impressive loggia on the top floor of the house. Nowadays, Bicocca degli Arcimboldi is property of the Pirelli Company who use it as a venue for conferences and private events.


Bridge of Sighs
Town: Venice
Address: Rio di Palazzo

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The Bridge of Sighs is the most romantic spot in Venice and the invariable highlight of every visit to the 'City of Water'. The covered limestone bridge links the old prison and the Doge's Palace over Rio di Palazzo. This location was the root of the popular name of the construction in the 19th Century,when the prominent English poet Lord Byron referred to it as 'Bridge of Sighs' in his poem 'Childe Harold's Pilgrimage', suggesting that the convicts must have sighed when passing the bridge en route to the prison and feeling free for the last time. The facility was designed by Antoni Contino and built between 1600 and 1603. Today it is a favourite place for tourists and especially for lovers – kissing under the bridge at sunset in hopes that, according to local legend, this will bring them eternal love. The magnificent sight from the bridge towards the lagoon and San Giorgio island is another appeal for visitors.


Bridge of Vittorio Emanuele II
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Bridge of Vittorio Emanuele II, by Matt Mason
Bridge of Vittorio Emanuele II
Town: Rome
Address: Ponte Vittorio Emanuele II
Phone: +39 6 48 8991
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The Bridge of Vittorio Emanuele II was designed in the late 19th Century by Ennio De Rossi. The project took over two decades to complete and was finally inaugurated in 1911. The three-arched bridge is decorated at each end by two tall columns topped with bronze representations of Winged Victory. However, the most eye-catching element of the decoration is the set of white marble sculptures on the pillars of the central arch, symbolising Unity of Italy, Liberty, Loyalty to the Constitution, and Oppression Defeated.


Broken Bridge
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Broken Bridge, by Bob Cortright
Broken Bridge
Town: Rome
Address: Lungotevere Pierleoni

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Ponte Rotto, originally known as Emilius was constructed in 193 BC. It was the city’s first entirely stone bridge, able to hold heavily laden carts that couldn’t use the less stable Sublicius Bridge made of timber. However, Ponte Rotto was not without its own weaknesses; its slanting position made it dangerously exposed to water damage. In the late 16th Century, a greater part of the structure was swept away in a violent flood. This is why nowadays it’s known as Ponte Rotto, meaning ‘broken bridge.’ It’s best viewed from Ponte Palatino.


Ca' Brüta
Town: Milan
Address: Via Moscova 12
Phone: +39 2 7252 4301
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Ca' Brüta, ‘the ugly house,’ was designed 1919 – 1923 by the architect team of Studio Barelli-Colonnese, whose employees included young Muzio. The building received its popular name as a result of the mixed reaction to its inauguration; many of its early reviewers considered it a spectacular failure. At the time of its completion, it differed considerably from the typical town mansions of the era. The facade of Ca' Brüta features abstract decoration based on geometric forms. The entire architectural order of the building is treated as a two-dimensional graphic element. Despite the early criticism, Ca' Brüta has come to be recognised as a genuine masterpiece of Italy’s early 20th-Century architecture.


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